Guest Post on The Interiors Addict with Liane Rossler

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The most exciting revelation in interior design at the moment is the gaining momentum of sustainable practices. Both designers and consumers are becoming more aware of the consequences of purchasing a mass produced cheap thrill. There is a renewed appreciation for the beauty of handmade objects and their skilled makers. We’re seeing truly innovative recycling projects everywhere, from our neighbours’ DIY to the latest online homewares store. It’s trendy to ‘upcycle’. It’s even trendier to do so whilst retaining good design and style.

With a vast array of projects on the go, Liane Rossler is succeeding at promoting local artisans, contributing to the recycling movement and sharing her knowledge as an advisor to the design industry. A creative pioneer based in Sydney, Liane has a reputation in the industry for her kind and generous spirit which is so apparent in her projects. I was lucky enough to interview Liane to find out what she is up to and to share her thoughts on the future of design.

The broad range of projects you are involved in is nothing short of inspiring. What are you working on at the moment?

I’ve been curating ‘Here and Now’ at Carriageworks for 2013 as part of their artistic program. It includes commissioned works by artists and designers for three projects: Useful, Totes and Lucky. 

I’m working with Sarah K on our Supercyclers project, making some Plastic Fantastic pieces for an exhibition in Italy. I’m doing an architecture workshop with my husband Sam for SCAF and their Fugitive Structures exhibition. Then there’s a design advisory day in October with Sydney Living Museums and The Garage Sale Trail (happening 26 October).

I work with a number of organisations and am onThe City of Sydney Retail Advisory Board, Creative Services Advisory at Sydney Living Museums, Editorial Advisory Board at ARTAND Australia, and Advisory Board at &Company. I’m an ambassador for 1 Million Women, for The Garage Sale Trail and am a member of The Voiceless Council. I’m also working on a variety of creative advisory, retail advisory, business and educational projects, as well as other independent design projects.

Your projects are diverse, but all share the common goal of taking action for a better future through creativity, considered living and good design. What are your hopes for the future of design and creative innovation in our society?

I’m excited by all the possibilities that design and creative innovation bring to society, and love discovering new ways of thinking that can make life better for others. I hope that people continue to create innovative and thoughtful ways to address the challenges that we face, and that the new wave of good things overcomes some of the not so good things.

What is your advice for lovers of all things design and interiors? How can we consume responsibly?

We all love to surround ourselves with beautiful things, so I think it is important that when we buy we think about how something was made, what it’s made from, who made it, where did it come from, how long it will last, and where will it go. There should be beauty in how something is made as well as what it looks like

I am a big believer in supporting local artisans and utilising honest, sustainable materials. I’d love to know who your favourite local artisans are and what materials are inspiring you at the moment?

I agree! I love materials innovation and I’m besotted by fungi and all the great things it can do. Other natural materials like algae hold huge potential. Wood and stone are always beautiful. I love seeing natural materials developed and used in unexpected ways.Sunlight is a pretty inspiring material and I love seeing all the developing technologies in solar power.

Local artisans like Dale Hardiman and Henry Wilson do consistently thoughtful and interesting work with sustainable materials, and artist Sarah Goffman does transformative work with everyday materials. I love the Tjanpi weavers, who create magic from local materials.

What’s next?

In 2014 I’m looking forward to more time to develop the design projects I’ve been working on, as well as more Supercyclers projects and a new Happy Talk project. I love working on all the advisory projects and look forward to seeing them continue to develop.

Here and Now: Lucky, by Liane Rossler

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This morning I popped down to the Carriageworks in Eveleigh to visit the latest instalment of Here and Now: Lucky.  Lucky has been curated by Liane Rossler to feature works by Australian and New Zealand creatives.  The concept is to explore the idea of luck and interpret their findings through design and art.

My favourite creation was the hanging bells called ‘let the pure wind release you’ by Tiffany Singh.  A concoction made from fabulous natural materials –  brass, copper, clay,  twine, beeswax, paper, flowers, leaves and natural dyes, these unusual objects really caught my eye!  Made in collaboration with other artists, the aim is to keep the ancient tradition of Kharki (bell making) alive.

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Other fun standouts were bronze knuckles and gold plated chicken wishbones, with wishes attached!  It’s well worth the visit.

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Please have a look at my guest post for The Interiors Addict on Liane Rossler and her latest projects….

http://theinteriorsaddict.com/qa-with-liane-rosler-on-sustainable-design

 

 

 

Local Artisan: Quercus and Co

Quercus and Co is a local artisan that has caught my eye recently.  I discovered the new wallpaper design and printing company whilst walking through a supplier showroom, their fresh-off-the-press wallpaper sample book drew me in with their watery-print designs and perfectly balanced colours.

Launched last year by Adam Jones, the papers are gaining recognition quickly in the Australian design industry.  I like them not only for their hand made style, but for the joyous feeling that they will evoke in any interior.  The designs are playful yet stylish, the multitude of colours can create unlimited effects and the texture of the paper itself will lend another tactile layer to a scheme.  All this, plus the bonus of being manufactured in an environmentally considered fashion.

‘We love the characteristics of hand-made marks on paper – washy watercolour, scratchy charcoal, soft pencil, blobby block-print. All our designs are first drawn or painted by hand and then printed using the latest digital techniques.’ – Adam Jones

Quercus and Co also offer art prints and bespoke wallpaper options.  It’s well worth checking out the website http://www.quercusandco.com

Local artisan: Dinosaur Designs

Dinosaur Designs have been a long time favourite of mine.  Today I visited their Extinct store in Strawberry Hills, Sydney, which is a great outlet to pick up reduced pieces.  It’s a small store, yet I spent what felt like an hour exploring all of the different shapes and colours, trying this with that, justifying in my head just one more vase.  Great fun.

While rather pricey, I like to keep in mind that each piece is hand made in Sydney using environmentally responsible practices.  This is really important to me as it supports local business and helps to keep skilled artisans employed.  I also know my purchases are unique and that I’ll have them forever.

Here’s some images from their Safari collection…

I hear there is a sale coming in September 20-22.

 

 

 

 

 

Local artisan: Sixhands

Today I was lucky enough to be re-introduced to local textile and wallpaper artisans Sixhands.  Australian owned, designed and made with a commitment to sustainable practices, Sixhands was founded in 2006 by three women – Alecia Jensen, Anna Harves and Brianna Pike.  I first learned of Sixhands a few years ago whilst sitting in traffic in Redfern, I used to peer in to the studio window and thought it all looked rather exciting, but never quite made it in there!  How fabulous now, that their designs be draped in front of me at a fabric showing.

What excites me most about Sixhands is that the designs are so versatile, all distinctly and proudly Australian in style.  From vivacious prints to monotone graphics to subtle neutrals, I am in overdrive plotting out where I can use them next.  I’d love to see Lorikeet Tequila Sunrise birds flying down my hallway walls!

See my favourites below;