Guest Post on The Interiors Addict with Liane Rossler

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The most exciting revelation in interior design at the moment is the gaining momentum of sustainable practices. Both designers and consumers are becoming more aware of the consequences of purchasing a mass produced cheap thrill. There is a renewed appreciation for the beauty of handmade objects and their skilled makers. We’re seeing truly innovative recycling projects everywhere, from our neighbours’ DIY to the latest online homewares store. It’s trendy to ‘upcycle’. It’s even trendier to do so whilst retaining good design and style.

With a vast array of projects on the go, Liane Rossler is succeeding at promoting local artisans, contributing to the recycling movement and sharing her knowledge as an advisor to the design industry. A creative pioneer based in Sydney, Liane has a reputation in the industry for her kind and generous spirit which is so apparent in her projects. I was lucky enough to interview Liane to find out what she is up to and to share her thoughts on the future of design.

The broad range of projects you are involved in is nothing short of inspiring. What are you working on at the moment?

I’ve been curating ‘Here and Now’ at Carriageworks for 2013 as part of their artistic program. It includes commissioned works by artists and designers for three projects: Useful, Totes and Lucky. 

I’m working with Sarah K on our Supercyclers project, making some Plastic Fantastic pieces for an exhibition in Italy. I’m doing an architecture workshop with my husband Sam for SCAF and their Fugitive Structures exhibition. Then there’s a design advisory day in October with Sydney Living Museums and The Garage Sale Trail (happening 26 October).

I work with a number of organisations and am onThe City of Sydney Retail Advisory Board, Creative Services Advisory at Sydney Living Museums, Editorial Advisory Board at ARTAND Australia, and Advisory Board at &Company. I’m an ambassador for 1 Million Women, for The Garage Sale Trail and am a member of The Voiceless Council. I’m also working on a variety of creative advisory, retail advisory, business and educational projects, as well as other independent design projects.

Your projects are diverse, but all share the common goal of taking action for a better future through creativity, considered living and good design. What are your hopes for the future of design and creative innovation in our society?

I’m excited by all the possibilities that design and creative innovation bring to society, and love discovering new ways of thinking that can make life better for others. I hope that people continue to create innovative and thoughtful ways to address the challenges that we face, and that the new wave of good things overcomes some of the not so good things.

What is your advice for lovers of all things design and interiors? How can we consume responsibly?

We all love to surround ourselves with beautiful things, so I think it is important that when we buy we think about how something was made, what it’s made from, who made it, where did it come from, how long it will last, and where will it go. There should be beauty in how something is made as well as what it looks like

I am a big believer in supporting local artisans and utilising honest, sustainable materials. I’d love to know who your favourite local artisans are and what materials are inspiring you at the moment?

I agree! I love materials innovation and I’m besotted by fungi and all the great things it can do. Other natural materials like algae hold huge potential. Wood and stone are always beautiful. I love seeing natural materials developed and used in unexpected ways.Sunlight is a pretty inspiring material and I love seeing all the developing technologies in solar power.

Local artisans like Dale Hardiman and Henry Wilson do consistently thoughtful and interesting work with sustainable materials, and artist Sarah Goffman does transformative work with everyday materials. I love the Tjanpi weavers, who create magic from local materials.

What’s next?

In 2014 I’m looking forward to more time to develop the design projects I’ve been working on, as well as more Supercyclers projects and a new Happy Talk project. I love working on all the advisory projects and look forward to seeing them continue to develop.

Here and Now: Lucky, by Liane Rossler

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This morning I popped down to the Carriageworks in Eveleigh to visit the latest instalment of Here and Now: Lucky.  Lucky has been curated by Liane Rossler to feature works by Australian and New Zealand creatives.  The concept is to explore the idea of luck and interpret their findings through design and art.

My favourite creation was the hanging bells called ‘let the pure wind release you’ by Tiffany Singh.  A concoction made from fabulous natural materials –  brass, copper, clay,  twine, beeswax, paper, flowers, leaves and natural dyes, these unusual objects really caught my eye!  Made in collaboration with other artists, the aim is to keep the ancient tradition of Kharki (bell making) alive.

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Other fun standouts were bronze knuckles and gold plated chicken wishbones, with wishes attached!  It’s well worth the visit.

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Please have a look at my guest post for The Interiors Addict on Liane Rossler and her latest projects….

http://theinteriorsaddict.com/qa-with-liane-rosler-on-sustainable-design

 

 

 

Local Artisan: Quercus and Co

Quercus and Co is a local artisan that has caught my eye recently.  I discovered the new wallpaper design and printing company whilst walking through a supplier showroom, their fresh-off-the-press wallpaper sample book drew me in with their watery-print designs and perfectly balanced colours.

Launched last year by Adam Jones, the papers are gaining recognition quickly in the Australian design industry.  I like them not only for their hand made style, but for the joyous feeling that they will evoke in any interior.  The designs are playful yet stylish, the multitude of colours can create unlimited effects and the texture of the paper itself will lend another tactile layer to a scheme.  All this, plus the bonus of being manufactured in an environmentally considered fashion.

‘We love the characteristics of hand-made marks on paper – washy watercolour, scratchy charcoal, soft pencil, blobby block-print. All our designs are first drawn or painted by hand and then printed using the latest digital techniques.’ – Adam Jones

Quercus and Co also offer art prints and bespoke wallpaper options.  It’s well worth checking out the website http://www.quercusandco.com

Styling your dining table: keep it simple

One thing I know is key to successful dining table styling is to keep it simple.  Unless you are a skilled stylist, too many colours, styles, complex centrepieces and crafty gimmicks found on Pinterest can get all too much.  I’ve found some lovely images (ahem… some on Pinterest) that I think are good examples to learn from.

The settings in the two images below have kept a muted and soft colour palette, introducing interest with layering and textured details.  The centrepiece sets the natural theme for the table and has been left on its own – not too fussy!  Light timber is echoed in the tableware and table itself.

Height can be cleverly introduced with sparse florals or twigs, like the beautiful magnolias below.  Guests will be able to see each other past this centrepiece.   Again, the colours are kept simple.

Any excuse to use your collections (as mentioned in my previous post… Styling your collections: the kookier the better!) can be very effective and add a personal touch, such as these vases, brought to life with fresh florals.  I think any setting deserves some sort of living feature, if not florals then fruit or vegetables can add a fresh element.

Finally, candles will add a warm finishing touch to any setting.  I love candelabras and candle sticks as they are romantic and entrancing as they burn down.  Tea lights are handy in adding a bit more light and sparkle.  There are some great safe candles out there which are battery operated and flicker continuously, a great option if you have flammable decorations nearby.  Just remember to dim the lights and enjoy everyone looking their best in a soft glow…

Learned on the job: mixing furnishings

As with any profession, there are some things that can only be learned on the job.  From my experience, getting that first job in Interior Design is no easy task.  I’d like to share some really vital tips in my next few posts that seem to be missing out there…

Mixing Furnishings

Successfully mixing furnishings is not an easy task and is something that Interior Designers will spend some time on, carefully considering their best options.  This is where reality TV shows are misleading – it’s not about a day of tearing through retail stores and making snap decisions, ending in bringing home half the showroom!

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http://sageatelier.files.wordpress.com/
This room really is an eclectic mix and is successful in relating each piece. The timbers are all harmonious in their tone, but not an exact match. The black and white zebra print is carried across from the floor to the sofa upholstery, even cleverly again in the black and white print on the wall. Colours are brought in on cushions, art and accessories that all seem to have a ‘friend’ somewhere else in the room.

Wether you are following a theme or putting together an eclectic mix, the pieces need to ‘talk to each other’.  There will need to be something that visually relates all of the furnishings.  Ask yourself, how does the colour of this chair (or texture, finish, pattern, shape, scale etc) sit with the colour of this side table?  Do they complement and bring out the best of each other?  Or do they clash and fight with each other?

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http://www.annerobin.com
Placing artworks in a french hang is fantastic practice at relating odd furnishings. These artworks appear random at first, but they all have colours that relate to other colours not far away. Framing is kept quite light in colour and thickness. The fabric on the sofa and cushions relate back to the artworks. See the geometric black and white artwork with the sofa? And the green leafy artwork with the cushion?

Furnishings don’t have to match and I think are better when they don’t.  Relating is more about linking one piece to another.  As an example, imagine a soft linen sofa placed on a sisal floor rug – both are natural tactile materials that will sit well together.  The same linen sofa placed on a graphic and bold synthetic floor rug… not so much.  Look for relations in style, texture, fabric, colour and shape.

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http://www.flodeau.com
The chairs are painted in different colours, but if you look closely you will see that these colours are taken from the wallpaper and are of similar intensity. The curving shape of the chairs is also reflected in the shape of the trees in the wallpaper.

Belle Editor-in-chief Neale Whitaker articulates my point well in a recent article– ‘Interior design becomes about balance and harmony – just because it’s free form doesn’t mean it’s a clash. There is a harmony and discipline to it.’

Styling your coffee table: fun and easy!

Styling a coffee table is a really enjoyable way to instantly transform a living room and display your favourite treasures.  With a few tried and tested tricks that I’ll share below, you’ll be able to update, rearrange and beautifully style not just your coffee table, but most other surfaces in your home!

Firstly, my golden rule above all else – it’s all about the layering.  

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Books

Stacks of books are a must for building height, adding colour and also imply a lot about the owner and their interests (so choose wisely!).  Neatly piled ‘coffee table’ books look great on their own, perhaps with an interesting object on top.  If your space needs a bit of character and edge, try sourcing some second hand vintage books, they are an incredibly cost effective tool in styling any space.

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Trays

Trays are perfect for grouping collections and acting as the base of a layer.  I look for trays that are a contrasting material or colour to the table, but also stay harmonious to the scheme.

Floral

I may be going off on a bit of an ‘ideal world’ tangent, but when you can, invest in or pick fresh floral arrangements, they will literally bring life and vibrancy to any table.  I promise you will feel so much happier every time you walk by.  A more long term option is an indoor plant.

Treasures

The objects that you pick up on holidays, receive as gifts, find in the park… anything that is special to you will personalise the scheme and add the perfect finishing touch.   I always like to have at least one organic object to soften the look, so this can be in place for in between floral arrangements.

One last thing, as Coco Chanel would say ‘Once you’ve dressed, and before you leave the house, look in the mirror and take at least one thing off’.  This advice applies just as well to styling.  Goodluck!

Having it all: A Designer’s Dilemma

Like a plumber with a leaking tap, a designer’s hardest job is their own home.  Honestly, we make our most difficult clients look like a breeze in comparison.  Personally, when it comes to my own home (which is currently rented, adding to the dilemmas), I am faced with such indecision that I end up doing nothing at all.  You see, I see so many beautiful homes, furnishings, textiles, styles, trends and every colour in between – how can I possibly choose?  How can I commit to a style, when I know I’m keeping my eyes open in case something better comes along?

I think I have found the answer.  I CAN HAVE IT ALL.

I can, really.  And I’ve found evidence, in Jessica Helgerson’s latest interior.  Here’s my checklist of my dream home – all found in the images attached.

* Neutral palette of whites and timbers, a must for all big purchases (just incase I change my mind again….)

* Moody grey / charcoal walls (ala Abigail Ahern)

* Light and airy space (a must)

* Australian / Scandi / Japanese style (in that order, mostly Aussie)